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Conference 2007 - Abstracts & Bios (A-Z)

Australasian Sound Recordings Association Conference
Conference will be held in the Board Room at the NFSA
Level 1, 144 Moray St, South Melbourne, Victoria.

“The Art of Audio” at
The National Film & Sound Archive, Melbourne
15th to 17th of August 2007

2007 ASRA Conference

2007 Conference Program

Conference Registration Form

Dr Ros Bandt

BIO

Ros Bandt, is an internationally acclaimed sound artist having pioneered many forms of sound art including original sound sculptures, interactive installations, site specific works, sound playgrounds and unique electroacoustic multichannelled sound works. She has curated large scale sound events, twice for the Melbourne International Festival and has been commissioned by the Paris Autumn Festival, the West Deutsche Rundfunk Studio for Acoustic Art. She is published by Wergo, EMI , New Albion and Move and is author of Sound Sculpture, co-editor of Hearing Places,U.K. and founding director  of  the Australian Sound Design Project online gallery, papers  and archive  at the University of Melbourne as honorary senior research fellow. She has a PhD in the performance practice of American Repetitive Music from Monash University. She is just finishing publishing Isobue, Japanese Sea Whistle, the new double CD from her recent residency with ABC Radio National.

http://www.rosbandt.com/

ABSTRACT

‘Recording for Experiential Flexible Sound Installation 1977-2007’

In this paper I will pose a number of essential questions to interrogate the role of sound recording in sound art, particularly installation: Sound recording of what?  why? for whom? where? when? and how? These  questions will be answered within the background context of a number specific installations: the 1977 audience interactive CoathangerEnvironment, the dummyhead water tank recordings, (Alchemy), the 8 channel interactive SSIIPP system for dancers and audience from 1987,(Starzones) and its digital development in Austria in 1992 (Pillars of Memory, 1993), to  the virtual spaces of the computer Altars of Power and desire), the flexible international 149 channels in the Grainger Museum  in 1997 (A Garden for Percy’s Delight, to the most recent Isobue 5.1. surround installation. It will be seen that each work is tailor made to the site, the time, the space and the people using it, thus shaping the requirements of the sound recording tasks at hand. In that the outcome is a flexible and moving listening journey for the auditor, the dimensionality of the recording in relation to the desired spatial field in playback and audience orientation is only one part of the total designed outcome of the finished sounding art work and the public presentations of these works.

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Jim Barbour

BIO

Jim has extensive experience working in the audio industry in Australia and overseas, with more than twenty years as a music producer and recording engineer and many years as a production manager in commercial radio. Jim worked overseas and in Australia in recording studios and conservatories of music, producing audio for vinyl, CD, radio, film and television. Credits include recording engineer for Men at Work’s ‘Business As Usual’, Sound Supervisor for the Australian Opera, film music awards and advertising awards for radio production. Jim has designed and delivered training programs at Swinburne University of Technology in Radio, Audio and Multimedia. Jim holds a Graduate Diploma of Education in Information and Communications Technology from Melbourne University and recently completed a Master of Communications with a thesis titled Digitizing Acoustic Space: the Impact of new Digital Audio Technology on Aural Perception.

ABSTRACT

The Lost Art of the Tape Drop-in

The rock music industry has been a major driving force in the development of the technology of analogue tape recording and the art of music production. Artistic practice developed procedures to push the limits of tape, and in turn the limitations defined the sound of music recordings for decades. Multi-track tape recorders allowed over-dubbing by musicians, allowing musicians to re-record inferior musical passages within a recording. The process of ‘dropping into record’ during a musical passage and replacing part of the recording, for example, replacing a line or a word in a vocal passage, then dropping out to retain the rest of the passage, was called a tape drop-in. It was a very precise skill, requiring extreme ear-hand coordination, utilising unique characteristics of the tape recorder. It is a lost art now, as digital audio recording allows all recordings to be undertaken with computer controlled precise timing and non-destructively, keeping all the fragments for later assembly. With analogue tape it was definitely destructive and also required artistic decision making during the recording session.

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Ken Berryman

BIO

Ken Berryman has worked out of the Melbourne Office of the NFSA since 1985, and currently manages the Archive's Oral History Program. He is an unashamedly parochial Melburnian with no audio qualifications to boast about, but great enthusiasm and high regard for the subject of and the people associated with this paper presentation...

ABSTRACT

W & G : From Printing Plates to Pop Platters

As Australian discographer Michael Looper noted in his 1992 listing, the W & G record label has always had an ‘aura of mystery’ about it.

Why and how did this precision engineering company become involved in the sound recording industry? How did such a small, Melbourne-based facility manage to become and remain competitive for so long in a marketplace dominated by the major record companies? Why did their records fare so poorly north of the Murray? And what caused the label’s closure in 1977?

In looking at the origins of the W & G Record Processing Company, development of its own catalogue label and recording studio, sales and distribution arrangements, and huge support of the local music industry over twenty years, this unashamedly parochial paper will also include snippets from interviews recorded with several pioneers of the Melbourne post-war recording scene held in the National Film and Sound Archive’s Oral History Collection.

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Mel Blachford

BIO

Mel Blachford is the Collections Manager at the Victorian Jazz Archive inc located in Wantirna Victoria. He is part of a volunteer group of 50 dedicated senior citizens. He is responsible for overseeing the Collections policy of VJA and ensuring all donations received are recorded and stored to museum preservation standards. His working life has been in the pharmacy profession and he has a long involvement in official pharmacy organisations. He was a member of the Pharmacy Board of Victoria for 20 years, and has worked on projects for the Pharmacy Guild of Australia and the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia. Mel’s passion for jazz since the 1950s led him to start working in the exciting atmosphere of the Victorian Jazz Archive on retirement from paid employment in 2005.

ABSTRACT

Making of an Archive

Which will trace the 10 years of growth of the Victorian Jazz Archive from humble beginnings in a suburban garage to the largest museum accredited archive devoted entirely to jazz recordings, photos and memorabilia in Australia. The mission statement of VJA is "Saving our jazz past for the future".

Mel Blachford, Collections Manager, will present a paper showing the progress and what can be achieved by a volunteer organization with limited financial resources. Some rare Jazz recordings from the archive will complete this presentation.

http://www.vicjazzarchive.org.au/

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Margie Borschke

BIO

Margie Borschke is a Sydney-based journalist and PhD candidate in Media and Communications at the University of Sydney. Her interests  are wide-ranging and include digital media and technology, copyright, network theory, grassroots culture, collectors, independent music culture and the arts. As a journalist she spent the bulk of her career in New York City where she contributed to many publications including The New York Times Magazine, The Times (UK), Spin, Rolling Stone and Harper's Magazine. In the mid-nineties, she covered the burgeoning culture of ‘Silicon Alley’ and contributed to and helped to create some of the earliest experiments in publishing on the web. In addition to her work in the mainstream media, she has also worked with cultural institutions like the Powerhouse Museum in Sydney and is a media consultant at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music.

Borschke moved to Sydney with her partner in 2002 and is writing a dissertation on the subject of copies and duplication and how individuals, communities, and businesses use them to create and communicate. She holds an Honours BA in Political Science from McGill University (where she also spent a year studying computer science) and a Masters Degree in Political Science from the University of Toronto. In her spare time she promotes and coordinates dance parties and community art events with her DJ partner, is an member of the Network of Uncollectable Artists and is an active participant in many online social communities. She lives in an apartment that is filled with vinyl records.

ABSTRACT

Listen Up: How MP3 bloggers use sound recordings to create and communicate

This paper will present qualitative research on mp3 blogs, a nascent online genre that uses sound recordings as the starting point for communication and artistic expression, documenting the motivations and experiences of a selection of mp3 bloggers through a series of email, voice and in-person interviews. 

MP3 bloggers, I argue, are engaged in form of asynchronous communication and creative expression, one that revolves around the action of making a recorded sound file, usually an mp3, freely available for download, often without permission of the copyright owner. Bloggers imbue existing sound recordings with new meaning and make public their personal relationship with these recordings through the juxtaposition of recorded sound with text, images and/or other sound files.  I’m particularly interested in bloggers who are digitizing their analogue collections (e.g. vinyl records and tapes) and examining whether these acts of duplication (most of which violate the recording's copyright) can be considered transformative and creative. I will draw parallels with contemporary DJ culture and the early-to-mid 20th Century folk traditions to prove that duplication can be an important creative and interpretive activity and demonstrate how bloggers are following on from these traditions. I am also interested in documenting the ways in which  bloggers have become influential as curators, taste makers, archivists and bootleggers in the music cultures in which they participate.

Most research on mp3 blogs has focused on the downloader rather than the blogger, often viewing mp3 blogs as a kind of unauthorised publicity, marketing or distribution tool and portraying the genre as the work of fans, amateur music journalists/publicists and tolerated pirate music publishers. I argue that these characterizations oversimplify a more complex creative activity and fail to recognise the participatory nature of contemporary music cultures. Given the current policy debates surrounding copyright and intellectual property, it is crucial that we have a clear and sophisticated understanding of what people actually do with their sound recordings if we are to create laws that protect both established and emerging forms of creation and expression.

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Kevin Bradley

BIO

Kevin Bradley is Curator of Oral History and Folklore and Director of Sound Preservation at the National Library of Australia. He is a member of the UNESCO Memory of the World Sub Committee on Technology (MoW SCoT) and Vice Chair of the IASA Technical Committee. He has been manager of the National Library's digital preservation program, and from 2004 to 2006 was the Sustainability Advisor for the Australian Partnership for Sustainable Repositories. He is President of the Australasian Sound Recordings Association (ASRA).

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Professor Jeff Brownrigg

BIO

Professor Jeff Brownrigg is a specialist in cultural heritage studies. He holds a D Phil in English from the University of York (UK) approached via a B Phil in Medieval Studies and an M Phil. in Music. Before this he completed a BA (Hons) at La Trobe University where he was a foundation student, following teacher training. He has published scores of articles in a variety of journals and periodicals. The most recent of these, in August 2007, in the National Library News examined the life of Gallipoli veteran Thomas Skeyhill.  In June, in the same periodical, he wrote about colonial Governor Sir Richard Bourke and his interest in the last opera of W A Mozart.  In 1990 he co-edited The Peoples Conventions, published by the Australian Senate and was the sole author of A New Melba: The Tragedy of Amy Castles (Sydney, 2006).  For twenty years he held senior positions at the National Film and Sound Archive, producing and publishing numerous historic re-releases of heritage materials on CD and video. These included The Shamrock and Wattle series of Irish-Australian performers released to mark the bicentenary of the 1798 Rebellion in Ireland. Currently, he teaches Museum Studies and also Cultural Heritage Interpretation at the University of Canberra where he pays special attention to AV history and sound culture. His most recent book Echoes of Ireland, which he co-edited, is a collection of essays concerning Irish-Australians and was launched by the Ambassador for Ireland on 2 August, 2007.

ABSTRACT

Sound Culture: Australian History and Recorded Sound Heritage

Sound recording has had a surprisingly low profile in the thinking of most Australian historians who have published accounts of Australian society and culture. This is a strange anomaly in a country whose first internationally conspicuous citizen was a singer and (later) a recording artist who achieved huge international fame. Australia quickly took up what was (in the 1890s) a new technology and recordings established an important foothold and an enduring place in the country’s psyche. This paper explores those early years, from about 1896 to 1931, pursuing the stories and Australian importance of those recording artists who would become mainstays of the early recording industry and whose voices remain accessible.  But it also explores perplexing issues such as a national failure to find ways of making sound recording more readily assimilated into mainstream curriculum as evidence (like any other sort of evidence) of a rich and complex Australian past. Is it a matter of old technologies becoming passé and dragging those who are represented in them into obscurity?  Is the culture they embody simply a “throw away” commodity  or do sounds of a living past preserve access to more of that past than has survived in written accounts? (Careers traversed in this paper include those of Melba, Florrie Forde, Billy Williams, Peter Dawson, a couple of Amys and an Ada, and one or two others.) 

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Brigid Burke

BIO

Brigid is an Australian composer, multi media artist, clarinet soloist, visual artist, and educator. She has performed extensively in solo and chamber recitals, both nationally and internationally. Highlights in 2007 have been Music Marathon Boston, Futura Festival Paris and The International Clarinet Festival in Vancouver Canada. In 2006 her work was performed in the Generative Art Conference GA06 in Milan Italy, Empirical Soundings for the Commonwealth Games, and various other performances throughout Australia. Brigid regularly performs with ensembles Tri Duo, Carte Blanche, David McNicole and The Free Music Ensemble.

She has received many awards and exhibited through out Japan and Taiwan and Australia in the Japanese International Hand Printed & Shhin Kohanga exhibitions. Her most recent CD recordings have been reviewed and broadcast internationally. The Performing Arts Board of the Australia Council, Japanese Printing Corporation, ANAT, South Australian Govt., Australian Asian Foundation, Community Arts Centers and Universities has supported Brigid in her performances, compositions and artwork. She has a Master of Music in Composition from Melbourne University Australia.

http://www.brigid.com.au

ABSTRACT

Integrating Sound, Visuals and Dance in Performance

This paper addresses some of the processes with integrating sound, visual and movement counterparts in performance. The questions this paper discusses is their any rules that can be made about correlating aspects of sound, visuals and dance that are flexible and practical but maintain integrity in all disciplines.

The paper analyses performance works examples Frenetic Illusion and Memories of a Shadow for Clarinet, live interactive audio electronics, dance and visuals (DVD). A discussion into the sonic vocabularies of extended clarinet acoustic techniques (micro-tonality), interactive electronics devices, interaction and control issues between the performer and the computer and real-time digital audio and visual devices.

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Scott Cameron

BIO

A graduate of the Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA) and the Australian Film, Television and Radio School, Scott holds a Bachelor of Arts in Musical Theatre and a Graduate Diploma in Screen Composition. He has composed and produced both acoustic and electronic music scores for forces ranging from small ensembles to orchestras, and his music has been recognised with a Film Critics' Circle of Australia Award for Best Music Score, the Johnny Dennis Music Award for Best Movie Theme and a nomination for Best Song For A Film or TV Series at the APRA/AGSC Screen Music Awards.

ABSTRACT

The Ramifications Of The Democratisation Of Technology On Music For Film.

Since sound was first synchronised to picture, film scoring has by necessity included the process of recording music which involved expensive equipment, specialised techniques and teams of highly skilled technicians. Todays technology allows anyone with a degree of skill to produce highly polished music for a relatively modest financial outlay. My discussion examines the ramifications of the democratisation of technology and the widespread use of digital multisamples for the role of screen composer, the process of composition, recording, mixing and of course, the end product - the music itself.

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Joseph Carra

Joseph Carra has been a full time mastering engineer for the past 15 years. He studied music and audio technology at LaTrobe Universtiy, and during this period landed a position as an apprentice, cassette mastering engineer in a cassette duplication factory. Since the mid 1990’s he’s been working in his own studio, Crystal Mastering, where his roles fluctuate between mastering and archival work. Currently he’s re-mastering work for the legendary Aussie rock band, ‘The Beasts of Bourbon’, as well as archiving the largest collection of Australian frog calls.

http://www.crystalmastering.com.au

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Jennifer Coombes

BIO

Jennifer has a Bachelor of Arts degree from the Australian National University and a Graduate Diploma in Information Management from the University of Canberra.  For the past eight years she has worked in cultural institutions as a manuscript librarian, curator and archivist (National Library, Australian War Memorial and National Gallery of Australia).  Jennifer held the position of Curator of Private Records for five years at the Australian War Memorial where she managed the Memorial's collection of private papers such as letters, diaries and scrapbooks.  Her interest in oral history began when I worked for three months in the Memorial's Film and Sound section.  Since she took up the position at the National Gallery in late 2006 she has been working with the James Gleeson oral history interviews and have become very interested in the use of the interview as a primary source document in collaboration with the more traditional documents valued by archivists and record managers.

ABSTRACT

Painting words: Artists and oral history at the National Gallery of Australia

In the late 1970s James Gleeson conducted nearly one hundred interviews with Australian artists whose works had been acquired by the National Gallery of Australia. Traditionally the paper-based record has been of fundamental importance to the archivist.  Oral history however is also a significant as a way of capturing memory.  It can play a particularly important role in the process of art acquisition.  In my paper I will look at how the James Gleeson interviews serve as a history of collection acquisition at the National Gallery.  Additionally, they provide useful documentary evidence about the works of art as well as a history of the work from creation through to display in a public gallery space. I will also consider that an artist’s engagement with the visual world does not affect his or her ability to speak about the experience of creating art.  The listener can gain a clear sense of the creative process and the context that has led the artist to create the work.  The storytelling recorded in the audio interviews by James Gleeson and the artists, captures the pleasures of memory and creativity.  Finally I will discuss how the collection of one hundred interviews has recently been digitised with the assistance of the National Library of Australia and ArtSound FM, and how current technology assists - and hinders  - access to these interviews.

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Robert Curgenven

BIO

Robert has previously lived and worked in and around Darwin, Katherine, Alice Springs in the Northern Territory, East Kimberleys, South Australia and the occasional indigenous community. His work with harmonics, textures and resonance are strongly tied to time living in remote areas - using field recordings and instrumental harmonics to create a sound which explores slowly shifting layers in the fabric of what surrounds us. Robert’s current sound work utilises recordings made with studio condenser microphones and Digital Audio Tape recorder which are transferred to CD and mixed by hand without a computer nor signal processing, He has released “cichaczem” through privatelektro (Germany), completed two commissions for ABC's Radiophonic Unit (2003, 2006), is included on the recent "recorded in the fields by..." compilation by "gruenrekorder" (2006) and his soundtrack to Lezsek Paul's "Terrain der Zeit" has has been included in screenings at Filmfest Dresden, Germany (2006) and Experyment V Internation Art Meeting Zbaszyn, Poland (2005). Robert organised the Sounds Unusual Festival of New Music in Darwin in June 2006 and also in Alice Springs in September 2007. He has had installations/group exhibitions in Darwin, Fremantle, Koln and Berlin and performed in the past two years throughout Australia and Germany, the Netherlands, France, Belgium, UK and Japan.

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Matthew Davies

BIO

Born in Sydney, Australia in 1959. Early work experience includes technical and client service positions in the telecommunications and music industries. Matthew worked at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation for ten years as an operator, technical producer, researcher and broadcaster. Commenced work at National Film & Sound Archive in 1993 in the Sound Preservation section, and later as Operations Manager of the Archive’s Preservation and Technical Services Branch with responsibility for administrative and operational support for programs including assessment of risk in NFSA's media collections and planning of active Preservation programs to maintain the collection content. Training experience includes a series of archiving workshops in Asia and the Pacific for radio and TV broadcasters supported by the AIBD, and an ongoing role as on-line tutor and lecturer in "Preservation of AV Media" offered originally by University of New South Wales and by Charles Sturt University since 2002. Matthew is an ASRA board member, deputy chair of the IASA National Archives Section and a member of the IASA Technical Committee. His current position is Senior Curator of Recorded Sound at the NFSA.

http://www.myspace.com/soundcurator

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ABSTRACT

Archiving In Second Life

The virtual online world "Second Life" provides a platform for "residents" to create in a variety of media, with live musical performance high on the list of popular attractions. Sound effects including background nature sounds, character vocalisations and effects associated with animated objects add to the second life soundscape and strengthen the illusion of immersion in a virtual world. A wide range of streaming media is also available, either user created or sourced from existing internet streaming channels. Institutions, including universities and libraries, are experimenting with the use of Second Life as an alternative interface to web based resources. Library and Archive communities are represented in Second Life by special interest groups which are a diverse,  international forum for investigation and discussion of the possibilities and challenges presented by Second Life and other similar platforms.

The world of Second Life is evolving rapidly and  is now four years old, with some users already showing interest in preserving the history and cultural artefacts of the Second Life community. This paper will discuss the authors encounters with the Second Life community, it's history, the activities of archivists working in Second Life, the potential use of Second Life for dissemination of archival resources, and the challenge of collecting and preserving the cultural artefacts of virtual worlds.

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Richard Dibbs

BIO

Richard holds a Graduate Diploma in Media from the Australian Film, Television & Radio School and has qualifications in Electronics and Television Production. Since the early 1990s he has been the proprietor of Archival Revivals, a sound restoration studio in Sydney, and is currently also on the Technical Staff at the University of Technology, Sydney, where he enjoys teaching engineering students.

Australia and its early history has become one of Richard’s passionate interests over the last 30 years.  Another of his long-term passionate interests, which brings him here today, is recorded sound and image – both the history and some aspects of current practice.

ABSTRACT

An Illustrated History of the Australian Record Industry : a review of the first seventy years of label designs and cover art, with photographs and audio clips.

Entertainment products and their associated technology have been with us in various forms for many generations now, although not always to all people at all times for minimal cost as they are today. This paper looks at (and listens to) certain aspects of the mass market for sound recordings over the first seventy years of its development in this country, with particular reference to the graphic arts as used for advertising and promotion. The evolution of the Australian Record Company (ARC) will be given special attention; most of the other players in the Australian industry will also receive an honorable mention, as will some of the lesser-known.

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Graham Dodsworth

BIO

Noted equally as a vocalist, guitarist, composer and entertainer, Graham Dodsworth has performed at countless public venues and institutions and over one hundred Australian Folk Festivals. He has a Master of Arts in Australian Folklore and was awarded the 2005 National Library of Australia Folk Festival Fellowship. Dodsworth has to date released three albums, 'Summer Madness', 'In Good King Arthur's Day' and his new CD 'In Our Time'.

http://www.dodsweb.com

ABSTRACT

Trawling the Library for Rough Diamonds

Graham describes his recent National Folk Fellowship at the NLA. Included in the delivery are examples of audio extracts of the songs collected and a live delivery of at least one of the interpretations rendered from the collected version.

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Maryanne Doyle

BIO

Maryanne is the Melbourne based Recorded Sound Archivist for the NFSA’s Recorded Sound Branch. Formerly she worked in variou s roles in the ABC Archives in Sydney. Recently Maryanne has become a member of the Board of the Australasian Sound Recordings Association (ASRA) and this year has convened the ASRA Conference.

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Grant Hansen

BIO

Grant Hansen is the CEO of Songlines Aboriginal Music Corporation and Chairman of the South Eastern Indigenous Media Association (SEIMA) which operates Melbourne's first Indigenous owned and managed radio station 3KND.  He also manages bands.

http://www.3knd.org.au/

ABSTRACT

Grant will discuss his various roles, and activities.

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James Hullick

BIO

James Hullick is a composer, pianist, vocalist and sound artist. His sonic works have been presented in Asia, North America and Europe for a variety of ensembles and electronic formats. Hullick is the co-founder and Artistic Director for JOLT Sonic Art Events, that is presenting it’s first season in 2007 in Melbourne.

Hullick has completed a Masters in composition at Melbourne University and is currently researching the phenomenon of “Recursion” for his PhD in the School of Art at RMIT University.

www.jameshullick.com

ABSTRACT

Through the looking glass through the looking glass : Documentation as art

“It was a surprise to me when I finally saw the Mona Lisa – that such a little painting could create such an impact.” A regular observation. “It was a surprise to me when I heard the music live it didn’t sound like the CD.” Another regular observation.

This talk will put forward the case that a live music performance and documented music performance are actually two separate art forms.  And that much of the great works of our time have become so because the documentation of those works has been presented as a separate artwork to the “live experience” of that artwork. And there is a physical/phenomological explanation for this, which is based on the physical properties of RECURSION.  Recursion is defined as “a process that reiterates itself.” But no re-iteration can be exactly like the previous reiteration because the laws of “real world” recursion state that “There is no such thing as a literal repeat”.

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Rainer Linz

BIO

Composer and sound artist Rainer Linz has a long involvement in radio, music theatre, instrumental and electronic music. His work includes an opera as well as numerous chamber and electronic pieces intended for concert performance. He is also an author and publisher. The Oxford Companion to Music in Australia (OUP 1999) notes "Linz's innovative and entrepreneurial work in Melbourne has been a significant factor in the city's prominence in experimental music."

His recent collaborative work includes the stage piece Banalities for the Perfect House and the interactive gallery installation infonoise (Belgrade 2001).

Under the title New Listener he has devised a series of computer programs where a music or sound composition can be adjusted to the listener's preference. He was a recipient of the Australia Council New Media Arts Fellowship for 2002/3. Current work includes the Fugue project.

http://www.rainerlinz.net/

ABSTRACT

The impact of technology on how audio is experienced.

Within the framework of interactive sound Rainer Linz will demonstrate some of his self-playing compositions.

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Anthony Magen

BIO

Anthony Magen (Melbourne) is interested in the relationship between people within the landscape and this concept covers many surfaces and textures from urban masterplanning to small scale sonic sculpture, responses to understanding 'NOISE' and what it means to society.

He has been exploring the otic sense through field recordings and contact mic experiments and with many australian improvisors, electrofringe 2004 (Instant Places I+II workshops) and live improvisations at SooB 2004 (Brisbane noise orchestra + Joel Stern + Clare Cooper) and regular Melbourne nights (plug n' play and Make it UP club) and is an avid contributor to the rotating members of the splinter orchestra. Recently conducted soundwalks included as part of the 2006 and 2007 NowNow festival held in Sydney. He has taught soundscape studies at RMIT and held workshops in Brisbane, Newcastle Melbourne and Hobart on listening.  Currently Vice President of the Australian Forum for Acoustic Ecology he was awarded a financial scholarship from the australia Council to Attend the world forum for acoustic ecology symposium in Japan. He works full time in Melbourne within the landscape architecture profession on projects that range in scale from town masterplans to designs for a childrens playground requiring varying responses in development and construction. These processes inform and reveal a desire to infuse landscape works with an audible twist.

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Kostas Metaxas

BIO

Kostas Metaxas' career in music recording & reproduction commenced with his very positive amplifier review in the German Magazine "DAS OHR" in 1982 and then being the "ABSOLUTE REFERENCE" for Germany's Stereoplay Magazine from1987 to 1994.

Kostas Metaxas transferred this expertise into Broadcast Television in the late 1990s [supplying content to over 60 Broadcasters including local Foxtel's Lifestyle, Ovation Channels and the ABC]

Winner of numerous business, design and export awards, Kostas Metaxas has been recording concerts with legendary performers such as Charles Dutoit, Jean Yves Thibaudet, Konstantin Lifschitz, Chick Corea, Gary Burton,Takacs, Il Giardino Armonico, James Morrison, Mike Nock, ACO, ASQ, Jerusalem Trio, Yvonne Kenny and Fritz Hauser.

A member of the US Recording Academy, he is currently researching a reference "location recording system" to assist with his recordings.

http://www.metaxas.com/

ABSTRACT

The Art of Location Recording

Over the past 25 years, the High-End Audio playback capabilities have improved to a very high level thanks to the pioneering efforts of a handful of Audio Magazine reviewers working with Designers who have developed a language to describe and compare the state of the playback art. This was only made possible because of the extraordinary quality of recordings produced in the 1950s and 1960's which are still the only "absolute" reference recordings used today.

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Vincent Plush

BIO

Long-time Grainger enthusiast, composer, writer and broadcaster Vincent Plush has recently joined the staff of the National Film and Sound Archive in Canberra.

Vincent Plush’s earliest training was as a pianist, organist and Cathedral chorister.  At the University of Adelaide, his major studies were in musicology, music education and composition. Moving to Sydney in 1971, he worked for several years in the ABC. He then taught at the NSW State Conservatorium, Australian Film and Television School and the University of New South Wales. In 1976 he founded The Seymour Group at the University of Sydney.

In late 1981, he was awarded a Harkness Fellowship that took him to the USA. Returning to Australia in 1984, he taught for several months at the Queensland Conservatorium. He was composer-in-residence for ABC Radio and Music Viva Australia in 1985-86, during which time he also formed The Magpie Musicians. Remaining in North America for most of the following decade, Plush was based at a number of educational institutions. Returning to Australia in 1999, he was the MacGeorge Professor at the University of Melbourne. He was based in Lismore for several months as Visiting Professor at Southern Cross University, before moving to Brisbane in August 2000.

Since that time, he has pursued a wide range of activities. He hosts local direct broadcasts for ABC Classic FM. In July 2002, he directed the Mini^Max festival at the Brisbane Powerhouse, the first event in the world dedicated to post-Minimalist music and art. He created the Voices series of contemporary Australian music for the Brisbane Writers Festival in September 2004.

For the past three years, he has directed Musicology classes at the Queensland Conservatorium.

ABSTRACT

Percy Grainger’s folksong collecting

Over-view of Grainger's folksong collecting with an Edison phonograph (especially in the British Isles, Scandinavia and the South Pacific), his philosophy on same and illustrated with recorded examples from the Grainger Museum, as restored by the National Film and Sound Archive.

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David Rentz

BIO

David and his wife Barbara came to Australia in 1977 after accepting a job in CSIRO Entomology, Canberra. His mission was to do taxonomic and behavioural work on the orthopteroid insects (grasshoppers, crickets, katydids and the like). To that end he published many scientific papers and several books and CD-ROM’s on the Australian fauna. During that time his interests in insect sound recording and vintage music led to a friendship with Peter Burgis and a role in the formation of IASA (Australia) and the Australasian Sound Recordings Association. He was President of ASRA from 1992-96.

After retiring from CSIRO he and his wife moved to Kuranda in north Queensland to get warm and they live happily in the rainforest with Cassowaries, Bruch Turkeys and plenty of insects.

He began a radio program in 1978 in Canberra on Community Radio Station 2XX in 1978. This features music of the 20’s and 30’s. the program continues and its origins have a direct relationship with this organisation which he will tell you about.

ABSTRACT

Hit Parade of Yesterday

The “Hit Parade of Yesterday” commenced broadcasting in March 1978 and continues to this day. It features music of the 20’s & 30’s, Australian and otherwise. Recently the program has been offered nationally on the Community Radio Network. The talk will discuss the origins and content of the program and the great changes in technology that have occurred during its tenure. Examples of the music content and highlights of interviews will be provided.

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Dr. Margery Smith

BIO

Margery Smith is a Sydney-based performer, composer and improviser. She has studied clarinet and saxophone at the Sydney Conservatorium of Music, as well as in Europe and the USA. Past lives have been as Associate Principal Clarinet with the Sydney Symphony and the Australian Opera and Ballet Orchestra. Presently, Smith performs with the Sonic Art Ensemble and Continuum Sax the Australia Ensemble. Recently, she has written for Orchestra Victoria, Continuum Sax, PACT Youth Theatre, and Sydney Omega Ensemble. Her career incorporates time spent lecturing at University of Newcastle Conservatorium of Music, composing, and various projects involving the use of improvisation and collaboration in educational and community contexts.

http://www.margerysmith.com/

ABSTRACT

The ‘doing’ informs the ‘thinking’ and the ‘thinking’ informs the ‘doing’- audio recording as creative process.

Throughout history, the role of technology has been to extend our perceptions. Audio recording provided us with a radical shift in aural perception; music could now be stored and reproduced exactly at any desired time and place.1 Listening back to recorded work enables one to tease out relationships in music that may only become clear after repeated listening. Audio recording becomes an interface between intuitive, real-time musical experience and conceptual thinking.

As a performer/composer, audio recording plays an essential part as a tool for reflection and informing decisions that I make in my creative process. I can listen back to my work, and then go back and try a new direction, or refine a work that already has a framework in place. This presentation will illustrate some of the ways that I have used audio recording to document my creative process with examples from a collaborative recording project that involved several groups of improvising musicians.

1.Maconie, R. (1989) Stockhausen on Music, London, Marion Boyars Publishers Ltd.

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John Tebbutt

BIO

Lecturer in Media Studies Program at La Trobe University John teaches in the areas of radio production, history and performance. John is Vice President of the Australian New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA) and Convenor of the Australian Radio-Audio Researchers Association (ARARA).

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 Carla Teixeira

BIO

Carla is a Communications graduate of Charles Sturt University. She has worked in performing arts administration, events coordination and film production. Carla has worked for the National Film and Sound Archive for the past 6 years and is now the Sydney based Recorded Sound Archivist for the NFSA’s Recorded Sound Branch. Her main focus is to build the Archive’s contemporary holdings. She is currently half way to completing a Master of Arts in Media Education at the University of New South Wales. And takes herbal sleeping tablets to get a good night’s sleep.

ABSTRACT

The Challenges of Archiving Experimental Music and Sound Art.

In a commercially driven sound culture and audio industry, experimental music is pushed to the outer margins of Australian cultural activity. The history and culture of experimental music in Australia is at risk of being lost for posterity. It’s survival is in the hands of young stakeholders with little awareness of the importance of cultural history. It’s ephemeral nature and the rapidly evolving technologies stimulating it’s evolution demand strategic archival intervention to ensure it’s survival into the future.

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Dr Frances Thiele

BIO

Frances Thiele is a professional historian and harpist. In 1995 she was visiting research scholar at Cambridge University and in 1997 won the E.W. Benham Prize for a PhD in Early Modern English History from the University of Adelaide. She worked for eight years as Field Historian at the State Library of Victoria developing websites and exhibitions, undertaking heritage surveys and oral history projects, and collecting donations for the Library’s special collections of Manuscripts, Pictures and Maps. She is an Honorary Research Associate with the History Program at La Trobe University and in 2007 was awarded The La Trobe Society’s inaugural fellowship for a study of Superintendent La Trobe’s management of the Port Phillip Aboriginal Protectorate.

As a musician, Frances has trained predominately with Xanya Mamunya from the Victorian College of the Arts and with jazz harpist Moira Lawry. She has also studied harp at the Flinders St School of Music in Adelaide and with Daphne Boden from the Royal Academy of Music in London. She has been a performer and teacher for nearly ten years and played with companies such as the Melbourne City Opera. In 2004 she joined the award winning composer and singer Scott Cameron to create Ionian Groove, a distinctive duo performing original arrangements of Broadway swing tunes from the 1930s-1940s.

Frances was on the ASRA board from 1999-2006 as both Secretary and Web Editor, and she was the convenor of the 2000 ASRA Conference 'Sounds of Federation'.

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Neville Thiele

BIO

Australian international authority on sound technology and a former head of technical services at the ABC. Awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) in 2003 for services to audio engineering particularly in the field of loudspeaker design and the development of audio engineering standards.

ABSTRACT

The Making of a Broadcasting Engineer ; Recollections of Broadcasting 1933-1962

Neville will describe the attitudes, conventions and equipment that shaped broadcasting in Brisbane in particular and Australia in general when he and his brother Len became involved in radio during the 1930’s, and how it came to shape their lives.

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Frank van Straten

BIO

Theatre historian, broadcaster, author and director of the Performing Arts Museum (Vic) from 1984-1993 Frank van Straten was awarded the Member of the Order of Australia (OAM) in recognition of his services to the performing arts. Frank received the ASRA Award in 2000 for outstanding contribution to the performing arts and broadcasting. He has produced a number of historical recordings including The Sound of Melbourne. 75 Years of 3LO.

ABSTRACT

Robert Chisholm – a forgotten Australian star

A bootmaker’s son born in Melbourne in 1894, Robert Chisholm had a long and interesting career on film, stage and radio here, in the United States and in Britain. He worked with immortals like Gladys Moncrieff, Katharine Hepburn, Jeannette Macdonald, Helen Morgan, Shirley Booth, Kurt Weill, Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, Ira Gershwin and Leonard Bernstein – yet he died in obscurity in Melbourne in 1960. Fortunately his recordings and films enable us to retrace his life and recapture his art.

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